Protected Bike Lanes

Protected Bike Lanes Update:

On Thursday July 2, 2015, the Governance and Priorities Committee approved that the City construct a two-way, physically protected bike lane with traffic signals for bikes on the north side of Pandora Avenue from Cook Street to Store Street. In addition, a  standard bike lane will be painted along Johnson Street. A combination of on-street parking spaces, bollards, paint and possibly planters will be used to separate the two-way bike lanes from vehicle traffic.

 City staff will update Council and present a detailed design for the two-way bike lanes in the coming months.

The GPC report with staff recommendations can be found here: Pandora_Johnson Cycling Corridors.pdf [PDF - 1.9 MB]

Below are the two design options that were taken out for public feedback along with the types of separation.

We want you to help design Victoria’s first physically protected bike lanes!

The City of Victoria recently dedicated $7.75 million over the next five years for the installation of more bike lanes, with many of them designed for cyclists all ages and abilities. We’ve heard that the community would like to see bike lanes connecting to downtown and physically separated bike lanes on busy roads.

One of the first major projects the City is undertaking as part of the new cycling network is introducing a protected bike lane running east and west through downtown. 

The City of Victoria is considering two options – a two-way, physically protected bike lane on Pandora Avenue paired with a painted bike lane on Johnson Street or a set of one-way physically protected bike lanes with one on Pandora Avenue, and one on Johnson Street. We are seeking feedback from the community on opportunities, concerns and preferred types of separation for both options.

 

 

What is a protected bike lane?

A protected bike lane physically separates bikes from cars, offering a cycling experience that is safer and more comfortable than standard bike lanes.  Raised medians, planters, on-street parking, or bollards (upright, on-street pylons) can be used to create this space for people on bikes. Protected bike lanes will encourage people of all ages and abilities to cycle in Victoria.

 

What is being considered?

Option A:

 

OptionA_ProtectedBikeLanesFinal.pdf [PDF - 7.9 MB]

A two- way, physically protected bike lane with traffic signals for bikes on Pandora Avenue and a standard painted bike lane on Johnson Street

                         

What a two-way protected bike lane would feel like for cyclists on Pandora Avenue:

A two-way protected bike lane on Pandora Avenue would connect the Galloping Goose Trail to downtown – people on bikes entering and exiting the downtown area would continue on a bike lane physically separated from moving traffic.  The Galloping Goose Trail is currently planned to connect at the Pandora Avenue and Store Street intersection.

While the a two-way protected bike lane along Pandora Avenue would run from Store Street to Cook Street, a main connection point will be at Vancouver Street, where the east-west protected bike lane will connect with the future north-south Vancouver Street route.  The Vancouver Street route is scheduled to be upgraded in 2016 and built to an All Ages and Abilities Standard, where all cyclists will feel comfortable. For cyclists wanting to continue east, a protected bike lane travelling south from the Cook Strret and Pandora Avenue intersection will connect cyclists to the eastbound bike lane that runs along Johnson Street.

Regardless of the final design chosen for Pandora Avenue, road space on Johnson Street will also be allocated for people riding bikes.

 

Two-way protected bike lane (with signal changes) – Pandora/Douglas looking towards the Johnson Street Bridge

 

 Option B:

 

OptionB_ProtectedBikeLanesFinal.pdf [PDF - 8.4 MB]

A set of one-way physically protected bike lanes with traffic signals for bikes, one on Pandora Avenue, one on Johnson Street  

 

How one-way protected bike lanes along Pandora Avenue and Johnson Street would feel in the downtown core:

This option involves westbound cyclists travelling along Pandora Avenue and eastbound cyclists travelling along Johnson Street, both in protected bike lanes. One-way protected bike lanes on both Pandora Avenue and Johnson Street with new traffic lights for cyclists would provide a similar level of protection to cyclists as the two-way option.

 

One-way protected bike lane (with signal changes) – Pandora/Douglas looking towards the Johnson Street Bridge

 

Similarities between Option A and Option B

New dedicated traffic signals for cyclists through Pandora intersections

New traffic lights will be installed to tell cyclists when they have the right-of-way. For the two-way along Pandora model, these new traffic lights would assist cyclists travelling with traffic and against traffic.

For both models, vehicle drivers would have a right turn signal phase, followed by a separate signal phase for cyclists. This means drivers at intersections would not be allowed to turn right across the protected bike lane when stopped at a red light, which helps eliminate potential conflicts between drivers and cyclists, as well as drivers and pedestrians. This is similar to the two-way bike lanes on Hornby Street and Dunsmuir Street in Vancouver.

 

The extra traffic signal phase results in a longer traffic signal cycle lengths

All traffic lights in downtown are coordinated. Providing a separate phase for right-turn traffic requires increasing the entire traffic signal cycle downtown network. The delay for all pedestrians at intersections could increase by approximately 10 seconds. Because the separate signal time for bikes and vehicles requires increasing traffic cycle lengths, impacts to pedestrians and drivers would be the same for both options.

Bike turn boxes at all intersections

People riding bikes on the protected bike lane(s) may come to a point where they need to turn right or left onto a north-south cross street. The protected bike lane will prevent cyclists from merging into traffic between intersections. Designated areas called bicycle turn boxes at each intersection will allow cyclists a way to turn right or left at intersections. To use this facility the cyclist enters the bicycle turn box and then waits for a light to turn, ending up on the correct side of the new side street. This avoids having to move out into traffic to change lanes, but the disadvantage of this can mean having to wait for up to two sets of lights to make the turn.

 

What is different between the two proposed options?

Parking:

Option A – Two-way along Pandora Avenue

A total of 44 on-street parking spaces on the north side of Pandora Avenue between Store Street and Cook Street would be removed to accommodate a two-way protected bike lane.  Approximately nine to 11 parking spaces would be removed in each block, except in the 700 and 800 blocks, where three on-street spaces per block would be removed.

Option B - one-way protected bike lanes along Pandora Avenue and Johnson Street

Overall, approximately 78 parking spaces would be removed along Pandora Avenue and Johnson Street. Approximately four to six parking spaces would be removed in each block, except in the 600 block, where nine on-street spaces would be removed and the 800 block, where only one on-street space would be removed. 

Costs

Two-way protected lane on Pandora

 

One-way bike lanes along Pandora and Johnson

The cost estimate for the two-way protected bike lane along Pandora Avenue is $2.16 million

The cost estimate for the one-way protected bike lanes along Pandora Avenue and Johnson Street is $2.925 million

 

The estimates for both options include construction of concrete medians, reconstruction of curb, gutter and sidewalk as required, new traffic signal hardware and associated underground ducting, downtown traffic signal network changes, tree removal and replacement, partial road repaving, bus shelter relocations, signs, and paint markings.

The cost is higher for the paired bike lanes as it is two facilities on two different streets and requires more concrete work to be completed, including signal changes and more paint markings.

 

Types of Separation

Based on the amount of available space, there are a number of types of possible separation for the new protected bike lanes that the City is looking for feedback on.  Several types of separation can be used along the corridor. They include:

  • Parked cars and paint
  • Park cars and paint with bollards (upright, on-street pylons)
  • Planters
  • Concrete barriers (could be combined with planters)

 

Parked cars and paint (can include bollards): Parked cars are moved to the outside of the bike lane so people riding bikes are protected from moving traffic and can ride safely between parked cars and the curb. An extra wide lane prevents car doors from hitting cyclists. Bollards are plastic cones that are attached to the ground on the outside of a bike lane. Research has shown that cyclists have a high level of comfort using bollards.

               

    

 

Planters:  Planters are another way to separate moving traffic from people riding bikes. Heavy planters are located on the outside of the bike lanes and can be filled with flowers, shrubs, and grass; making the street pleasant for all users.

   

 

Permanent or modular concrete barriers (could be combined with planters): Permanent concrete barriers run at street level and protect people riding bikes from moving traffic with a permanent concrete curb. Modular concrete barriers also run at street level and protect people riding bikes from moving traffic with a modular or moveable curb.

                

  

 

 

Two-way Pandora bike lane versus twinned one-way bike lanes along Johnson and Pandora

 

Two-way bike lane   (Pandora)

Twinned one-way bike lanes (Pandora & Johnson)

Location

From Store Street to Cook Street

From Store Street to Cook Street

Design

Two side-by-side bike lanes, along Pandora Avenue, protected from traffic

Single bike lanes along Pandora Avenue and Johnson Street, protected from traffic

Travel   direction for bikes

Bikes would travel westbound and eastbound on Pandora Avenue

Bikes would travel eastbound on Johnson Street and westbound on Pandora Avenue

Key connections

Would connect directly to the Galloping Goose Trail, via future multi-use path from the new Johnson Street Bridge. 

 

Comfort  levels on the Goose are very high. This would connect these cyclists with the downtown core. 

 

Would connect directly to the future multi-use path on the bridge and existing bike lanes on Pandora.

 

Would connect directly to the existing bike lanes east of Cook Street on both Pandora Avenue and Johnson Street. 

 

A direct  connection to the Galloping Goose Trail and Johnson Street by a bike lane along Store Street.

 

A new painted extra-wide bike lane have also recently been added on Johnson Street

Cost

(Additional maintenance costs estimated from the Johnson Street Bridge to the east end of the corridor) 

$2.16 million – Up front costs

Additional Maintenance Costs:

 

Total additional maintenance costs excluding maintenance of planters:  $57,700 per year (includes bicycle traffic signals, signs and paints and additional street sweeping)

 

*Plus $60 per year per planter

$2.925 million – Up front costs

Additional Maintenance Costs:

 

Total additional maintenance costs excluding maintenance of planters:  $128,700 per year (includes bicycle traffic signals, signs and paints, hanging flower basket maintenance and additional street sweeping)

 

*Plus $60 per year per planter

 

     

Considerations for people riding bikes

- Direct connection with Galloping Goose

 

- Provides physical separation from motor vehicle traffic, increasing the feeling of safety and comfort for new and inexperienced cyclists.  

 

- Possible increased conflicts with motor vehicles at driveway and intersection crossings

 

- Provides physical separation from motor vehicle traffic increasing the feeling of safety and comfort for new and inexperienced cyclists

 

- Protected bike lanes along two of Victoria’s main streets

 

Considerations   for people walking

- May deter people on bikes from riding on the sidewalk 

 

- Increased separation from motor vehicles 

 

- Increased delay at intersections (10 secs)

 

- May deter people on bikes from riding on the sidewalk 

 

-  Increased separation from motor vehicles

 

- Increased delay at intersections (10 secs)

Considerations   for people driving cars

- Right turns on red lights will be prohibited

 

- Physical separation from people on bikes 

 

- Some reduction in motor vehicle capacity on Pandora

 

-  Possible increased conflicts with people on bikes at driveway crossings

 

- Possible increase in fuel consumption, emissions and increased travel times 

 

- Physical separation from people on bikes 

 

- Some reduction in motor vehicle capacity on Pandora and Johnson

 

- Right   turns on red lights will be prohibited

 

- Possible increase in fuel consumption, emissions and increased travel times 

Considerations   for local businesses

- Loss of parking

- Increased bike traffic

 

- Impacts to parking

- Increased bike traffic

Impacts on parking  

- Loss of 44 parking spaces.

 

-  Loss of 78 parking spaces

Construction   timelines

- Six months construction duration

 

- Lane closures and parking restrictions as required

 

- Traffic congestion

 

- Some limited access to areas during construction

- Six months construction if both bike lanes are constructed at the same time

 

- Lane closures and parking restrictions as required

 

-Traffic congestion

 

- Some limited access to areas during construction