Tools and Resources

For Residents

How do we organize a Block Party?

Block Parties are a great way to celebrate a special occasion or milestone with neighbours. To ensure there is appropriate coordination and planning, you will need to apply for a permit a month before the event. The information below will help guide you. Upon approval, a permit will be issued free of charge.  You can also apply for a Great Neighbourhood Grant to help with the cost for your first event. Contact staff at culture@victoria.ca

How can I help my neighbourhood prepare for an emergency?

The City is developing Connect and Prepare, a resilience and emergency preparedness program for neighbourhood blocks. The program includes the creation of an emergency station for the block or building and a series of facilitated workshops. The pilot program will be offered again in 2019.  Contact staff at emvic@victoria.ca 

How can we start a BlockWatch program?

BlockWatch is a neighbourhood-based program to reduce crime and build relationships amongst residents. The time commitment to participate is modest and the process to start a Block Watch program is simple. You only need to canvas the neighbours on your block for support, then contact VicPD Community Programs Coordinator to schedule a block meeting.

How can I get space for a garden?

The City supports gardening and food production. The easiest way to obtain access to gardening space is through the Boulevard Garden program, which allows to use the public boulevard in front of your house without a permit, as long as you follow program guidelines.  If don’t have access to a boulevard, an allotment garden plot may be a good fit.  Many neighbourhoods have them.  In some cases, there may be limited existing gardens and a new allotment or commons garden is desired. Staff are available to assist you with investigating the various options. Contact the Food Systems Coordinator.

For Neighbourhood Associations

How can we discuss neighbourhood issues with the City?

Residents’ organizations can contact their City Council liaison or staff person assigned to their neighbourhood at any time. Another good way to have community conversations is to organize a walkshop. Neighbourhood Walkshops bring residents and City staff together for a citizen-led walking tour to discuss issues and opportunities of interest to residents. Find out more in the Walkshop Residents’ Guide.

How can we better connect with residents?

In 2018, the City and Volunteer Victoria co-hosted a training workshop for neighbourhood associations for improving engagement with residents. This included a presentation on undertaking neighbourhood surveys. A guidebook onStrengthening Community Participation has also been prepared to assist neighbourhood associations assess their approach to connecting with residents.